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As much as possible, the Ultimate Linux Newbie Guide scours the net to find the best in guides, tips, tricks and tutorials. This month, we've found the following guides which you'll no doubt find helpful.

Monthly Tutorials: Handy Tutorials for March

As much as possible, the Ultimate Linux Newbie Guide scours the net to find the best in guides, tips, tricks and tutorials. This month, we’ve found the following guides which you’ll no doubt find helpful. Have a look at some of these goodies: How to format storage devices in Linux. A comprehensive but succinct tutorial on using parted and lsblk from the command line to deal with partitioning and formatting disks. [Linux.com]. How to install Owncloud…


Using Google Drive via the Ubuntu Control Center

How to use Google Drive, OneDrive, Dropbox, Amazon S3 and more in Linux

Google Drive hasn’t been supported on Linux officially, well, ever…. It’s been possible to use it in the past using third party apps like inSync or the more basic Gdrive. However since version 3.18, the GNOME desktop has inbuilt support for Google Drive ‘files’. We will also be covering a third party tool called RCloneBrowser which supports OneDrive and Dropbox as well as Google Drive, so you can choose whether you’d like to use the new ‘native’…


How to mount a USB stick as a non-root user with write permission

So you want to use a USB stick or a USB hard drive, and you don’t want to mount it as root every time? Why would you want to do this? It’s a hassle to mount the USB stick using sudo every time – you have to type the root password, and you have to specify all the mount options each time you  mount it. The permissions on a FAT32 USB stick or drive don’t…


Using Google Drive from the Linux Command Line

GDrive Gdrive is a command line tool which manages, uploads, downloads, deletes and shares files on Google Drive. You can download the tool from Github at https://github.com/prasmussen/gdrive. Unfortunately it does not support file synchronisation. Installation Download the binary package from the github website and install sudo mv drive /usr/local/bin Alternatively you can install from source code. Next, simply run drive and it will provide you a URL which authenticates you using OAuth. Usage drive [global options] <verb>…


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How to automatically make your Windows drives become available to Linux on startup.

Here’s a handy utility that will save you any technical nastiness. It’ll make your Windows drives (partitions) show up in the Ubuntu file manager so you don’t have to mount them by hand each time you want to access them. 1. Launch the Synaptic Package Manager or the Ubuntu Software Centre. 2. Search for ‘NTFS Configuration Tool’ 3. Install it. 4. Once installed make sure any drive you wish to Auto-mount is unmounted. Do this either…